Late prevertebral abscess after anterior cervical fusion.

Abstract

STUDY DESIGN We present a unique case of a 54-year-old woman who developed a prevertebral abscess 2 years after anterior cervical fusion in the absence of previously reported risk factors for late infection. The literature relevant to this topic is reviewed. OBJECTIVE To report a rare complication of a commonly performed surgery. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) is one of the most commonly performed spinal surgeries. The complication rate is relatively low; the risk of infection is only 0.1% to 1.6%. In the late postoperative setting, more than 6 months, wound infections are very rare and are often associated with an esophageal perforation secondary to hardware migration. METHODS We present a rare complication of a deep wound infection in a 54-year-old woman 2 years after an anterior cervical fusion. On serial radiograph imaging after surgery, the surgical level demonstrated progressive fusion. At 2 years, however, the patient presented with acute dysphagia. Computed tomography (CT) of the neck with contrast demonstrated a rim enhancing prevertebral mass, which was treated with wound exploration and debridement. Direct laryngoscopy at the time of surgery did not demonstrate a breach in the esophageal mucosa and inspection of the esophagus during surgery did not reveal a diverticulum, tear, or breach in the esophagus. RESULTS After surgical exploration and debridement the patient was placed on a 6-week course of antibiotics. Her dysphagia improved significantly after debridement of the prevertebral abscess. CONCLUSION Late occurring, deep wound infections are a rare complication of anterior cervical fusion. Dysphagia in the late postoperative setting should be considered carefully and evaluated for esophageal perforation or deep wound infection.

DOI: 10.1097/BRS.0b013e3181fc9b09

Cite this paper

@article{Christiano2011LatePA, title={Late prevertebral abscess after anterior cervical fusion.}, author={Lana D. Christiano and Ira Goldstein}, journal={Spine}, year={2011}, volume={36 12}, pages={E798-802} }