Late onset cytomegalovirus disease in liver transplant recipients: de novo reactivation in recurrent hepatitis C virus hepatitis.

Abstract

Late onset cytomegalovirus (CMV) disease (occurring more than 1 year post-transplant] was documented in two liver transplant recipients with recurrent hepatitis C virus hepatitis in the absence of factors known to precipitate CMV disease, i.e., primary acquisition of CMV, allograft rejection, augmented immunosuppression, concomitant infections, or blood transfusions. Both patients had CMV enteritis (with CMV adrenalitis in one case]; however, other symptoms and signs of overt CMV infection, i.e., fever, leukopenia, or atypical lymphocytes, were lacking. Hepatitis C virus is an immunomodulatory virus; impaired CMV-specific T-cell responses may have accounted for the predisposition of our patients to unprovoked, late onset CMV disease. Given the high incidence of hepatitis C virus recurrence after liver transplantation, awareness of the occurrence and recognition of the unusual presentation of CMV disease in this setting is both clinically relevant and significant, particularly since CMV is treatable if recognized promptly.

Cite this paper

@article{Singh1998LateOC, title={Late onset cytomegalovirus disease in liver transplant recipients: de novo reactivation in recurrent hepatitis C virus hepatitis.}, author={Nina Singh and Adriana Zeevi and Timothy J Gayowski and Ignazio Marino}, journal={Transplant international : official journal of the European Society for Organ Transplantation}, year={1998}, volume={11 4}, pages={308-11} }