Late Quaternary Extinctions: State of the Debate

@article{Koch2006LateQE,
  title={Late Quaternary Extinctions: State of the Debate},
  author={Paul L Koch and Anthony D. Barnosky},
  journal={Annual Review of Ecology, Evolution, and Systematics},
  year={2006},
  volume={37},
  pages={215-250}
}
  • Paul L Koch, Anthony D. Barnosky
  • Published 2006
  • Biology
  • Annual Review of Ecology, Evolution, and Systematics
  • Between fifty and ten thousand years ago, most large mammals became extinct everywhere except Africa. Slow-breeding animals also were hard hit, regardless of size. This unusual extinction of large and slow-breeding animals provides some of the strongest support for a human contribution to their extinction and is consistent with various human hunting models, but it is difficult to explain by models relying solely on environmental change. It is an oversimplification, however, to say that a wave… CONTINUE READING

    Figures and Tables from this paper.

    Citations

    Publications citing this paper.
    SHOWING 1-10 OF 317 CITATIONS

    Pleistocene Overkill and North American Mammalian Extinctions

    VIEW 4 EXCERPTS
    CITES BACKGROUND
    HIGHLY INFLUENCED

    Climate predictors of late quaternary extinctions.

    FILTER CITATIONS BY YEAR

    2005
    2020

    CITATION STATISTICS

    • 38 Highly Influenced Citations

    • Averaged 33 Citations per year from 2018 through 2020

    References

    Publications referenced by this paper.
    SHOWING 1-10 OF 15 REFERENCES

    Prolonged coexistence of humans and megafauna in Pleistocene Australia.

    Extinction risk from climate change

    VIEW 1 EXCERPT

    Lower Palaeolithic hunting spears from Germany

    VIEW 1 EXCERPT