Late Pleistocene human population bottlenecks, volcanic winter, and differentiation of modern humans.

@article{Ambrose1998LatePH,
  title={Late Pleistocene human population bottlenecks, volcanic winter, and differentiation of modern humans.},
  author={Stanley H Ambrose},
  journal={Journal of human evolution},
  year={1998},
  volume={34 6},
  pages={
          623-51
        }
}
  • Stanley H Ambrose
  • Published 1998
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Journal of human evolution
  • The "Weak Garden of Eden" model for the origin and dispersal of modern humans (Harpending et al., 1993) posits that modern humans spread into separate regions from a restricted source, around 100 ka (thousand years ago), then passed through population bottlenecks. Around 50 ka, dramatic growth occurred within dispersed populations that were genetically isolated from each other. Population growth began earliest in Africa and later in Eurasia and is hypothesized to have been caused by the… CONTINUE READING

    Citations

    Publications citing this paper.
    SHOWING 1-10 OF 341 CITATIONS

    Upper Pleistocene Human Dispersals out of Africa: A Review of the Current State of the Debate

    • Amanuel Beyin
    • Medicine, Biology
    • International journal of evolutionary biology
    • 2011
    VIEW 4 EXCERPTS
    CITES BACKGROUND
    HIGHLY INFLUENCED

    The Pleistocene archaeology and environments of the Wasiriya Beds, Rusinga Island, Kenya.

    VIEW 3 EXCERPTS
    CITES BACKGROUND

    Demography and the extinction of European Neanderthals

    VIEW 2 EXCERPTS
    CITES METHODS & BACKGROUND

    Climate and Demography in Early Prehistory: Using Calibrated 14C Dates as Population Proxies

    VIEW 8 EXCERPTS
    CITES BACKGROUND
    HIGHLY INFLUENCED

    FILTER CITATIONS BY YEAR

    1999
    2020

    CITATION STATISTICS

    • 23 Highly Influenced Citations

    • Averaged 16 Citations per year from 2018 through 2020

    References

    Publications referenced by this paper.
    SHOWING 1-10 OF 178 REFERENCES

    Genetic admixture in the late pleistocene.

    VIEW 3 EXCERPTS

    Mismatch distributions of mtDNA reveal recent human population expansions.

    VIEW 10 EXCERPTS
    HIGHLY INFLUENTIAL