Late Pleistocene Human Skeleton and mtDNA Link Paleoamericans and Modern Native Americans

@article{Chatters2014LatePH,
  title={Late Pleistocene Human Skeleton and mtDNA Link Paleoamericans and Modern Native Americans},
  author={James C. Chatters and Douglas J. Kennett and Yemane Asmerom and Brian M. Kemp and Victor J Polyak and Alberto Nava Blank and Patricia A. Beddows and Eduard G. Reinhardt and Joaqu{\'i}n Arroyo-Cabrales and Deborah A Bolnick and Ripan Singh Malhi and Brendan Culleton and Pilar Luna Erreguerena and Dominique Rissolo and Shanti Morell-Hart and Thomas W. Stafford},
  journal={Science},
  year={2014},
  volume={344},
  pages={750 - 754}
}
American Beauty Modern Native American ancestry traces back to an East Asian migration across Beringia. However, some Native American skeletons from the late Pleistocene show phenotypic characteristics more similar to other, more geographically distant, human populations. Chatters et al. (p. 750) describe a skeleton with a Paleoamerican phenotype from the eastern Yucatan, dating to approximately 12 to 13 thousand years ago, with a relatively common extant Native American mitochondrial DNA… Expand
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