Late Ordovician geographic patterns of extinction compared with simulations of astrophysical ionizing radiation damage

@inproceedings{Melott2009LateOG,
  title={Late Ordovician geographic patterns of extinction compared with simulations of astrophysical ionizing radiation damage},
  author={Adrian L. Melott and Brian C. Thomas},
  booktitle={Paleobiology},
  year={2009}
}
Terrestrial mass extinctions have been attributed to a wide range of causes. Some of them are external to Earth, such as bolide impacts (as widely discussed for the K/T boundary) and radiation events. Among radiation events, there are possible large solar flares, nearby supernovae, gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), and others. These have variable intensity, duration, and probability of occurrence, although some generalizations are possible in understanding their effects (Ejzak et al. 2007). Here we… 
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