Late Life: A New Frontier for Physiology

@article{Rose2005LateLA,
  title={Late Life: A New Frontier for Physiology},
  author={M. Rose and Casandra L. Rauser and Laurence D Mueller},
  journal={Physiological and Biochemical Zoology},
  year={2005},
  volume={78},
  pages={869 - 878}
}
Late life is a distinct phase of life that occurs after the aging period and is now known to be general among aging organisms. While aging is characterized by a deterioration in survivorship and fertility, late life is characterized by the cessation of such age‐related deterioration. Thus, late life presents a new and interesting area of research not only for evolutionary biology but also for physiology. In this article, we present the theoretical and experimental background to late life, as… 

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