Last Endemic Mammals in Hispaniola

@article{Woods1981LastEM,
  title={Last Endemic Mammals in Hispaniola},
  author={C. Woods},
  journal={Oryx},
  year={1981},
  volume={16},
  pages={146-152}
}
After searching many remote regions in the Caribbean island of Hispaniola, the author discovered that the island's last two endemic mammals, formerly believed to be rare, are in fact common in some areas. But human pressures on the hutia Plagiodonria aedium and the solenodon S. paradoxus are such that, unless the Governments of Haiti and the Dominican Republic take effective steps both could soon become extinct. 
In Search of the Extinct Hutia in Cave Deposits of Isla de Mona
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A new subspecies of hutia (Plagiodontia, Capromyidae, Rodentia) from southern Hispaniola.
TLDR
The first craniodental material is reported for the southeastern Hispaniolan hutia population, and it is demonstrated that this population can also be differentiated using quantitative morphometric analysis from other Hispaniola hutia subspecies. Expand
Population history of the Hispaniolan hutia Plagiodontia aedium (Rodentia: Capromyidae): testing the model of ancient differentiation on a geotectonically complex Caribbean island
TLDR
Phylogenetic analysis using mitochondrial DNA reveals a pattern of historical allopatric lineage divergence in Hispaniolan hutia, with the spatial distribution of three distinct hutia lineages biogeographically consistent with the island’s geotectonic history. Expand
A late-Holocene bird community from Hispaniola: Refining the chronology of vertebrate extinction in the West Indies
TLDR
The Trouing Jean Paul fossils portray a late-Holocene bird community that already had experienced four or more millennia of Amerindian presence, but had not yet been influenced by the activities of European or African peoples over the past 500 years. Expand
Taxonomy-testing and the ‘Goldilocks Hypothesis’: morphometric analysis of species diversity in living and extinct Hispaniolan hutias
TLDR
Finite Mixture Analysis was used to assess the best fit of different taxonomic hypotheses to the fossil mandibular size distribution, and demonstrated that levels of morphological variation between modern hutia populations are lower than levels between living hutia and P. spelaeum, so that living hutias are interpreted as the single species P. aedium. Expand
The Last Survivors: current status and conservation of the non-volant land mammals of the insular Caribbean
The insular Caribbean is among the few oceanic-type island systems colonized by non-volant land mammals. This region also has experienced the world's highest level of historical mammal extinctions,Expand
A new genus and species of ‘giant hutia’ (Tainotherium valei) from the Quaternary of Puerto Rico: an extinct arboreal quadruped?
TLDR
It is unlikely that decreasing aridity and the reduction of Puerto Rican savanna-type environments at the end of the Pleistocene contributed to the extinction of the arboreal Tainotherium, and habitat destruction by pre-Columbian Amerindians may instead have been responsible. Expand
Solenodon paradoxus (Soricomorpha: Solenodontidae)
TLDR
S. paradoxus is 1 of 2 extant species in the genus Solenodon, and 2 subspecies are recognized; the species is one of few venomous mammals with venom delivery through a channel in a modified lower incisor. Expand
Independent evolutionary histories in allopatric populations of a threatened Caribbean land mammal
TLDR
Improved understanding of Hispaniolan solenodon evolutionary history provides an important baseline for identifying wider patterns of intra-island diversification and prioritizing conservation attention for evolutionarily significant populations. Expand
Continued survival of Hispaniolan solenodon Solenodon paradoxus in Haiti
Abstract The Hispaniolan solenodon Solenodon paradoxus, one of only two surviving native Hispaniolan land mammals, has declined drastically in Haiti and has only been recorded from the Duchity regionExpand
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