Laser in situ keratomileusis to treat myopia: Early experience

@article{Pallikaris1997LaserIS,
  title={Laser in situ keratomileusis to treat myopia: Early experience},
  author={Ioannis G. Pallikaris and D. Siganos},
  journal={Journal of Cataract and Refractive Surgery},
  year={1997},
  volume={23},
  pages={39–49}
}
Purpose: To present our early experience in methodology and results of laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) in treating moderate and high myopia. Setting: Vardinoyannion Eye Institute of Crete and the Cornea and Refractive Surgery Service, Department of Ophthalmology, Heraklion University Hospital, Crete, Greece. Methods: Forty‐three moderately to highly myopic eyes had LASIK. Follow‐up was between 12 and 24 months. The Draeger’s rotor microkeratome was used to create a 150 wm thick 8.5 × 9.5… 
Stability after laser in situ keratomileusis in moderately and extremely myopic eyes
TLDR
The refractive effect of myopic LASIK up to −15.0 D remained reasonably stable during the second postoperative year, and significant regression of the refractiveEffect occurred in eyes with higher levels of myopia, with the risk of progressive ectasia.
Laser in situ keratomileusis to correct refractive errors after keratoplasty.
TLDR
The correction of refractive error with LASIK in postkeratoplasty patients proved to be safe, effective, and predictable, and further studies are needed to determine the method's clinical value.
Complications of laser in situ keratomileusis for the correction of myopia.
TLDR
LASIK is acceptably safe for the correction of myopia and complications occur in approximately 5% of cases, these rarely lead to visual loss of more than two Snellen lines and postoperative acuity below 20/40.
Safety and predictability of laser in situ keratomileusis enhancement by flap reelevation in high myopia
TLDR
Retreatment of residual myopia by reelevating the flap was relatively safe and predictable, with a low risk of sight‐threatening complications, however, longer term studies may be required to detect late complications.
Laser in situ keratomileusis retreatment for residual myopia and astigmatism.
TLDR
Lifting the flap during LASik retreatment was relatively easy to perform and did not result in visual morbidity in eyes treated from 3 up to 18 months after primary LASIK.
Laser in situ keratomileusis for high myopia with the VISX star laser.
TLDR
Laser in situ keratomileusis for high myopia with the VISX Star laser provided satisfactory refractive and visual results that compare well with other reports in the literature.
Laser in situ keratomileusis in patients with corneal guttata and family history of Fuchs' endothelial dystrophy
TLDR
Patients with mild corneal guttata and a family history of Fuchs' dystrophy are prone to transientCorneal edema, loss of BSCVA, endothelial cell loss, and myopic regression after uneventful LASIK for correction of myopia and myopia astigmatism.
Résultats cliniques du laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) chez le myope: étude sur 390yeux
TLDR
LASIK is a safe and efficient surgical treatment for low, moderate and high myopia, and should be improved with new software and new corneal shapers.
Subclinical inflammation after laser in situ keratomileusis in corneal grafts
TLDR
Uneventful LASIK induced subtle, short‐lasting anterior chamber flare when measured by the laser flare meter, and appeared to be a safe and effective procedure for residual refractive errors in corneal grafts.
Retreatment after laser in situ keratomileusis1
TLDR
Empithelial ingrowth and flap melting were more frequent after than before LASIK retreatment, whereas decentration and night-vision symptoms improved.
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