Larval retention and connectivity among populations of corals and reef fishes: history, advances and challenges

@article{Jones2009LarvalRA,
  title={Larval retention and connectivity among populations of corals and reef fishes: history, advances and challenges},
  author={G. P. Jones and Glenn R. Almany and Garry R. Russ and Peter F. Sale and Robert S. Steneck and Madeleine J. H. Oppen and Bette L. Willis},
  journal={Coral Reefs},
  year={2009},
  volume={28},
  pages={307-325}
}
The extent of larval dispersal on coral reefs has important implications for the persistence of coral reef metapopulations, their resilience and recovery from an increasing array of threats, and the success of protective measures. This article highlights a recent dramatic increase in research effort and a growing diversity of approaches to the study of larval retention within (self-recruitment) and dispersal among (connectivity) isolated coral reef populations. Historically, researchers were… 
Local retention, dispersal and fluctuating connectivity among populations of a coral reef fish
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TLDR
To make rapid progress in understanding the scales and patterns of connectivity, greater communication between empiricists and population modelers will be need to track and assimilate evolving empirical results.
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TLDR
Microsatellite markers were developed to evaluate fine-scale genetics and recruit assignment via genetic parentage analysis and inferred larval dispersal distances can be inferred for each individual larvae in Kimbe Bay, Papua New Guinea.
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Well‐designed and effectively managed networks of marine reserves can be effective tools for both fisheries management and biodiversity conservation. Connectivity, the demographic linking of local
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TLDR
Seasonal and interannual patterns of larval dispersal in a metapopulation of the coral reef fish Amphiprion polymnus are documented, and consistent patterns suggest snapshot parentage analyses can provide useful dispersal estimates to inform spatial management decisions.
Theme section on “Larval connectivity, resilience and the future of coral reefs”
Coral reef ecosystems typically develop as patches of shallow coral reef habitat that can be separated by long distances. Ecologists have had a particular interest in understanding the degree to
Larval Dispersal and Population Connectivity in Anthozoans
TLDR
This review synthesizes the progress in the understanding of the processes affecting dispersal and connectivity in anthozoans, and examines the caveats inherent to the genetic and modeling approaches used in most connectivity studies.
Connectivity dominates larval replenishment in a coastal reef fish metapopulation
TLDR
Comparison of the data with previous studies suggested that variation in dispersal distances is likely to be influenced by the geographical setting and spacing of sub-populations.
Evolutionary and ecological connectivity at hierarchical scales from sperm to species in the reef-building coral genus Seriatopora
TLDR
The findings suggest that species diversity within the genus Seriatopora is higher than expected on the GBR, and imply that global diversity may also be higher for the genus, both of which have significant implications for the ability to accurately assess and conserve biodiversity, and infer connectivity patterns.
Large‐scale, multidirectional larval connectivity among coral reef fish populations in the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park
TLDR
Genetic parentage analysis is applied to investigate larval dispersal patterns for two exploited coral reef groupers within and among three clusters of reefs separated by 60–220 km within the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park, Australia to highlight the potential for long‐distance dispersal in an important group of reef fishes.
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