Larval niche selection and evening exposure enhance adoption of a predacious social parasite, Maculineaarion (large blue butterfly), by Myrmica ants

@article{Thomas2002LarvalNS,
  title={Larval niche selection and evening exposure enhance adoption of a predacious social parasite, Maculineaarion (large blue butterfly), by Myrmica ants},
  author={J. A. Thomas},
  journal={Oecologia},
  year={2002},
  volume={132},
  pages={531-537}
}
  • J. Thomas
  • Published 2002
  • Medicine, Biology
  • Oecologia
Abstract. Larvae of the butterfly genus Maculinea feed briefly on a foodplant before being adopted as social parasites into Myrmica ant nests. Each Maculinea species typically survives only with a single Myrmica species, yet the eggs are laid across the overlapping territories of 3–5 Myrmica species and several other ants. The ability of Maculinea arion – a 'predatory' species of Maculinea – to influence its adoption into host Myrmica colonies was studied for the first time in the field. Some… Expand
Multiple host-ant use by the predatory social parasite Phengaris (=Maculinea) arion (Lepidoptera, Lycaenidae)
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Overall low parasitism rates may explain the vulnerability of Phengaris (=Maculinea) arion in Central Europe but further studies are also necessary. Expand
To lay or not to lay: oviposition of Maculinea arion in relation to Myrmica ant presence and host plant phenology
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It is hypothesize the evolution of an adaptive mechanism that affords females of this strictly myrmecophilous butterfly the ability to ensure the long-term survival of their brood by selecting host plants growing near a Myrmica nest. Expand
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Habitat preferences of Maculinea arion and its Myrmica host ants: implications for habitat management in Italian Alps
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TLDR
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Host propagation permits extreme local adaptation in a social parasite of ants.
TLDR
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TLDR
It is hypothesized that Maculinea rebeli caterpillars mimic the touch pheromones of ant worker-larvae, which would explain the inability of ants to recognize caterpillar before touching them, their immediate adoption by any Myrmica species after discovery, host specificity inside wild ant-nests, the absence of queen-effect and the intimate attention of host workers. Expand
Food–plant niche selection rather than the presence of ant nests explains oviposition patterns in the myrmecophilous butterfly genus Maculinea
  • J. Thomas, G. Elmes
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Series B: Biological Sciences
  • 2001
TLDR
Data is presented for the five European species of Maculinea and it is concluded that conservation measures should continue to be based on the null hypothesis (H0) that females randomly select food plants whose flower buds are at a precise phenological stage, making oviposition independent of ants. Expand
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Caterpillars of Maculinea arion have an exceptional ability to withstand starvation, and sometimes survive to parasitize more than one Myrmica colony, and despite these adaptations, predation is an inefficient way to exploit the resources of a MyRMica nest. Expand
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TLDR
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Adoption of parasitic Maculinea alcon caterpillars (Lepidoptera: Lycaenidae) by three Myrmica ant species
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Larvae of lycaenid butterflies that parasitize ant colonies provide exceptions to normal insect growth rules
TLDR
It is suggested that Maculinea -type growth pattern has arisen convergently in at least three unrelated lineages of lycaenids, which might include the need for reduced early growth to produce late instars that are small enough to be integrated as brood mimics into ant social systems, combined with the need to achieve at least the same adult size as the ancestral species. Expand
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