Larval marbled salamanders, Ambystoma opacum , eat their kin

@article{Walls1995LarvalMS,
  title={Larval marbled salamanders,
 Ambystoma opacum
 , eat their kin},
  author={Susan C Walls and Andrew R. Blaustein},
  journal={Animal Behaviour},
  year={1995},
  volume={50},
  pages={537-545}
}
The eVect of kinship on larval cannibalism was examined in the marbled salamander. In separate behavioural trials, cannibalistic larvae were presented with two smaller conspecifics (a 'prey group'), matched for size, that were (1) siblings of the cannibal, (2) non-siblings and (3) one sibling and one non-sibling (i.e. a mixture of two sibling groups); larvae were allowed to consume only one conspecific during each trial. This experiment was repeated in 2 consecutive years with larvae from two… Expand

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