Large decrease in ocean-surface CO2 fugacity in response to in situ iron fertilization

@article{Cooper1996LargeDI,
  title={Large decrease in ocean-surface CO2 fugacity in response to in situ iron fertilization},
  author={David J. Cooper and Andrew J. Watson and Philip D. Nightingale},
  journal={Nature},
  year={1996},
  volume={383},
  pages={511-513}
}
THE equatorial Pacific Ocean is a 'high-nitrate, low-chlorophyll' region where nitrate and phosphate are abundant all year round. These nutrients cannot therefore be limiting to phytoplankton production. It has been suggested that the bioavailability of iron—a micronutrient—may be preventing full biological utilization of the major nutrients1–3. The results of a previous in situ iron fertilization experiment in this region provided support for this hypothesis4, but the observed biological… Expand
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Simulated biogeochemical responses to iron enrichments in three high nutrient, low chlorophyll (HNLC) regions
To fill temporal gaps in iron-enrichment experimental data and gain further understanding of marine ecosystem responses to iron enrichments, we apply a fifteen-compartment ecosystem model to threeExpand
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