Large carnivore attacks on hominins during the Pleistocene: a forensic approach with a Neanderthal example

@article{Camars2015LargeCA,
  title={Large carnivore attacks on hominins during the Pleistocene: a forensic approach with a Neanderthal example},
  author={Edgard Camar{\'o}s and Mari{\'a}n Cueto and Carlos Lorenzo and Valent{\'i}n Villaverde and Florent Rivals},
  journal={Archaeological and Anthropological Sciences},
  year={2015},
  volume={8},
  pages={635-646}
}
Interaction between hominins and carnivores has been common and constant through human evolution and generated mutual pressures similar to those present in worldwide modern human-carnivore conflicts. This current interaction is sometimes violent and can be reflected in permanent skeletal pathologies and other bone modifications. In the present paper, we carry out a survey of 124 forensic cases of dangerous human-carnivore encounters. The objective is to infer direct hominin-carnivore… 
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Carnivore damage on Neanderthal fossils is a much more common taphonomic modification than previously thought. Its presence could have different explanations, including predatory attacks or
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Similar cranial trauma prevalence among Neanderthals and Upper Palaeolithic modern humans
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The archaeozoological study suggests that lion-specialized pelt exploitation and use might have been related to ritual activities during the Middle Magdalenian period and argues for a role of hunting as a factor to take into account.
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