Language that dare not speak its name

@article{Pullum1997LanguageTD,
  title={Language that dare not speak its name},
  author={G. Pullum},
  journal={Nature},
  year={1997},
  volume={386},
  pages={321-322}
}
Proposals by a school board in California to recognize the dialect used by most of its pupils unleashed a ferocious media attack. Why did the press get things so wrong, and why were the proposals so virulently ridiculed? 
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References

Language and Social Context