Language experience shapes fusiform activation when processing a logographic artificial language: An fMRI training study

@article{Xue2006LanguageES,
  title={Language experience shapes fusiform activation when processing a logographic artificial language: An fMRI training study},
  author={Gui Xue and Chuansheng Chen and Zhen Jin and Qi Dong},
  journal={NeuroImage},
  year={2006},
  volume={31},
  pages={1315-1326}
}
The significant role of the left midfusiform cortex in reading found in recent neuroimaging studies has led to the visual word form area (VWFA) hypothesis. This hypothesis suggests that years of experience reading native language change the visual expertise of this region to be especially sensitive to the visual form of native language. The present study aimed at testing this hypothesis by exploring the role of language experience in shaping the fusiform activation. We designed a logographic… Expand
Short-term language experience shapes the plasticity of the visual word form area
TLDR
Functional magnetic resonance imaging clearly illuminates that the plasticity of the VWFA can be shaped by short-term language experience, bridging the gap between short- term and long-term experiences in language learning. Expand
The Neural Substrates of Visual Perceptual Learning of Words: Implications for the Visual Word Form Area Hypothesis
TLDR
The results confirm conjecture that the fusiform visual word form area is not dedicated to words, and visual expertise acquired with training reduces rather than increases its activity. Expand
Unimodal and multimodal regions for logographic language processing in left ventral occipitotemporal cortex
TLDR
Findings indicated that there are both unimodal and multimodal word areas for non-alphabetic language reading, and that activity in these two word-specific regions are independent of task demands at the linguistic level. Expand
The left fusiform area is affected by written frequency of words
TLDR
The goal of this study was to investigate the time course and neural correlates of word processing in right-handed readers engaged in an orthographic decision task and shed some light on the possible neural substrate of visual reading disabilities such as developmental surface dyslexia or pure alexia. Expand
The “visual word form area” is involved in successful memory encoding of both words and faces
TLDR
It is found that, both within and across subjects, stronger activity in the VWFA was associated with better recognition memory of both words and faces, and supported the view that the left mid-fusiform cortex plays a general role in the successful processing and memory of different types of visual objects. Expand
Brain sensitivity to print emerges when children learn letter–speech sound correspondences
TLDR
The occipito-temporal print sensitivity thus is established during the earliest phase of reading acquisition in childhood, suggesting that a crucial part of the later reading network first adopts a role in mapping print and sound. Expand
Orthographic transparency modulates the functional asymmetry in the fusiform cortex: An artificial language training study
TLDR
The results provide an alternative account (i.e., orthographic transparency) for the laterality difference between Chinese and alphabetic languages, and may have important implications for the role of the fusiform in reading. Expand
Chinese Character and English Word processing in children's ventral occipitotemporal cortex: fMRI evidence for script invariance
TLDR
Results support the script invariant role of the VWFA and also support the idea that the areas recruited for character or word processing are rooted in object processing mechanisms of the left OTC. Expand
Emerging neural specialization of the ventral occipitotemporal cortex to characters through phonological association learning in preschool children
TLDR
It is demonstrated that learning artificial‐character speech–sound associations enhances activation to trained characters in the vOT and that the magnitude of this activation and the functional connectivity of the left FFG to the parieto‐occipital cortex depends on learning performance. Expand
Learning to read words in a new language shapes the neural organization of the prior languages
TLDR
Critical imaging evidence is provided for the influence of learning to read words in a new language on word reading in native and second languages as well as the effects of the new language were modulated by the subjects' proficiency level. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 76 REFERENCES
Language-specific tuning of visual cortex? Functional properties of the Visual Word Form Area.
TLDR
This result demonstrates that the VWFA is initially plastic and becomes attuned to the orthographic regularities that constrain letter combination during the acquisition of literacy. Expand
The myth of the visual word form area
TLDR
There is no evidence thatvisual word form representations are subtended by a single patch of neuronal cortex and it is misleading to label the left midfusiform region as the visual word form area, according to functional imaging studies. Expand
The visual word form area and the frequency with which words are encountered: evidence from a parametric fMRI study
TLDR
The relation of increasing frequency and decreasing activation in occipitotemporal regions corresponds to a similar relation in the same brain regions found by studies which experimentally manipulated object or face familiarity. Expand
The visual word form area: spatial and temporal characterization of an initial stage of reading in normal subjects and posterior split-brain patients.
TLDR
The findings provide direct support for the main components of the classical model of reading and help specify their timing and cerebral substrates. Expand
Mapping of verbal working memory in nonfluent Chinese–English bilinguals with functional MRI
Existing cognitive and neural imaging studies have suggested a frontoparietal network of multiple, cooperative components for verbal working memory (WM). We used functional MRI to investigate whetherExpand
The Development of Specialized Brain Systems in Reading and Oral-Language
  • J. Booth, D. Burman, +4 authors M. Mesulam
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • Child neuropsychology : a journal on normal and abnormal development in childhood and adolescence
  • 2001
TLDR
Two principal results were consistent with the hypothesis that development is characterized by increasing specialization, and children showed primarily overlap of activation in brain regions for the visual and auditory tasks. Expand
The anatomy of language: contributions from functional neuroimaging
  • C. Price
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • Journal of anatomy
  • 2000
TLDR
From functional imaging results, a new anatomically constrained model of word processing is proposed which reconciles the anatomical ambitions of the 19th Century neurologists and the cognitive finesse of the 20th Century cognitive models. Expand
Common and Segregated Neuronal Networks for Different Languages Revealed Using Functional Magnetic Resonance Adaptation
TLDR
Two experiments in English-Chinese bilinguals who read rapidly presented word pairs in a block design and an event-related fMRI study suggest that while the networks for Chinese and English word processing have shared components, there are also components that may be language specific. Expand
An fMRI study with semantic access in low proficiency second language learners
TLDR
The results suggest that at least at single-word level, there are shared neural substrates for semantic processing of L1 and L2 even when one is at a very low L2 proficiency level. Expand
Subliminal Convergence of Kanji and Kana Words: Further Evidence for Functional Parcellation of the Posterior Temporal Cortex in Visual Word Perception
Recent evidence has suggested that the human occipito-temporal region comprises several subregions, each sensitive to a distinct processing level of visual words. To further explore the functionalExpand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...