Language as gesture.

@article{Corballis2009LanguageAG,
  title={Language as gesture.},
  author={Michael C. Corballis},
  journal={Human movement science},
  year={2009},
  volume={28 5},
  pages={
          556-65
        }
}
  • M. Corballis
  • Published 1 October 2009
  • Psychology
  • Human movement science
Tool-use-associated sound in the evolution of language
TLDR
It is hypothesized that the production and perception of sound, particularly of incidental sound of locomotion (ISOL) and tool-use sound (TUS), also contributed to the evolution of musical abilities, auditory working memory, and abilities to produce complex vocalizations and to mimic natural sounds.
Comprehensible Output and the Effec ts of Music and Movement in Spanish Language Acquisition
TLDR
Spatial prepositions that describe physical location are looked at to determine if it is easier for language learners to visualize the physical location with the use of musical imagery and gesture in tandem to determine the effects of the combined TPR and INMI methods on the language learner’s ability to recognize, retain and reproduce the new vocabulary.
Right hand, left brain: genetic and evolutionary bases of cerebral asymmetries for language and manual action.
TLDR
The theory that language itself evolved within the praxic system, and became lateralized in humans, and perhaps to a lesser extent in the authors' common ancestry with the great apes is supported.
Positive effects of grasping virtual objects on memory for novel words in a second language
TLDR
The results show that grasping of virtual objects can lead to superior memory performance and to lower reaction times during recognition.
Rising tones and rustling noises: Metaphors in gestural depictions of sounds
TLDR
The results showed that depicting gestures are based on systematic analogies between a referent sound, as interpreted by a receiver, and the visual aspects of the gestures: auditory-visual metaphors, and suggested a different role for vocalizations and gestures.
The effects of gestures and pictures on word acquisition and use in children with autism spectrum disorders
Although gestures have been found to aid the development of verbal communication, little is known about their influence on functional communication of young children with Autism Spectrum Disorders
For in Psychology there are Experimental Methods and Conceptual Confusion : From Embodied Cognition to Wittgenstein on Language and Mind
Embodied Cognition (EC) is a new psychological version of an old philosophical idea: human cognition is grounded in sensorimotor experience. According to EC there is not such an entity as abstract
Visual Attention, Indicative Gestures, and Calls Accompanying Gestural Communication Are Associated With Sociality in Wild Chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes schweinfurthii)
TLDR
It is suggested that self-relevance cues and synchronized pant-hoot calls accompanying gestures may increase the efficiency of gestural communication in social bonding and that multimodal communication may have played a key role in language evolution.
The effects of silent visuomotor cueing on word retrieval in Broca's aphasies: A pilot study
TLDR
It is hypothesized that providing patients with primes in the form of silent videos showing lip motions representative of correct pronunciation of target words, will result in faster word retrieval than when no such cue is provided, and might be beneficial in lexical relearning in chronic Broca's patients.
Animal Models of Speech and Language Disorders
  • S. Helekar
  • Biology, Psychology
    Springer New York
  • 2013
TLDR
This book discusses birdsong, apes, language and the Brain, and the Repertoire of Communication Calls Emitted by Bats and the Ways the Calls are Processed in the Inferior Colliculus.
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References

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  • M. Corballis
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It is argued that language evolved from manual gestures, gradually incorporating vocal elements, and may be traced through changes in the function of Broca's area, the code for both the production of manual reaching movements and the perception of the same movements performed by others.
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Primate Communication and the Gestural Origin of Language [and Comments and Reply]
Wallace, Tylor, Wundt, Johannesson, and others have proposed that human language had its basis in hand and arm gestures. The Gardners' work with the chimpanzee Washoe, Premack's study of the
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Is the neural basis of vocalization different in non-human primates and homo sapiens?
TLDR
The hypothesis is advanced that the last step in the evolution of the phonatory system in the brain was the outgrowing and augmenting of the fine fibre portion of the pyramidal tract synapsing directly with the motor nuclei for the vocal cords and the tongue, so that the direct and voluntary control of vocal behaviour became possible.
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