Language Analysis in Schizophrenia: Diagnostic Implications

@article{Morice1982LanguageAI,
  title={Language Analysis in Schizophrenia: Diagnostic Implications},
  author={Rodney D. Morice and John C. L. Ingram},
  journal={Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry},
  year={1982},
  volume={16},
  pages={11 - 21}
}
  • R. Morice, J. Ingram
  • Published 1 June 1982
  • Psychology
  • Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry
Language profiles were developed for schizophrenic, manic and non-psychotic control subjects from the analysis of free speech samples. The profiles comprised syntactic variables reflecting the complexity, integrity and fluency of spoken language. Linguistic differences between the 3 diagnostic groups enabled accurate (95%) classification by discriminant function analysis. The results suggest an important role for language analysis in psychiatric diagnosis. 

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