Language, mind and brain

@article{Friederici2017LanguageMA,
  title={Language, mind and brain},
  author={Angela D. Friederici and Noam Chomsky and Robert C. Berwick and Andrea Moro and Johan J Bolhuis},
  journal={Nature Human Behaviour},
  year={2017},
  volume={1},
  pages={713-722}
}
Language serves as a cornerstone of human cognition. However, our knowledge about its neural basis is still a matter of debate, partly because ‘language’ is often ill-defined. Rather than equating language with ‘speech’ or ‘communication’, we propose that language is best described as a biologically determined computational cognitive mechanism that yields an unbounded array of hierarchically structured expressions. The results of recent brain imaging studies are consistent with this view of… 
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