Language, gesture, and the developing brain.

@article{Bates2002LanguageGA,
  title={Language, gesture, and the developing brain.},
  author={Elizabeth A. Bates and Frederic K. Dick},
  journal={Developmental psychobiology},
  year={2002},
  volume={40 3},
  pages={
          293-310
        }
}
  • E. Bates, F. Dick
  • Published 1 April 2002
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • Developmental psychobiology
Do language abilities develop in isolation? Are they mediated by a unique neural substrate, a "mental organ" devoted exclusively to language? Or is language built upon more general abilities, shared with other cognitive domains, and mediated by common neural systems? Here, we review results suggesting that language and gesture are "close family", then turn to evidence that raises questions about how real those "family resemblances" are, summarizing dissociations from our developmental studies… Expand

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