Landscape rules predict optimal superhighways for the first peopling of Sahul.

@article{Crabtree2021LandscapeRP,
  title={Landscape rules predict optimal superhighways for the first peopling of Sahul.},
  author={Stefani A. Crabtree and Devin A. White and Corey J. A. Bradshaw and Fr{\'e}d{\'e}rik Saltr{\'e} and Alan N. Williams and Robin J. Beaman and Michael I. Bird and Sean Ulm},
  journal={Nature human behaviour},
  year={2021}
}
Archaeological data and demographic modelling suggest that the peopling of Sahul required substantial populations, occurred rapidly within a few thousand years and encompassed environments ranging from hyper-arid deserts to temperate uplands and tropical rainforests. How this migration occurred and how humans responded to the physical environments they encountered have, however, remained largely speculative. By constructing a high-resolution digital elevation model for Sahul and coupling it… 
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An advanced stochastic-ecological model is presented to test the relative support for scenarios describing where and when the first humans entered Sahul, and their most probable routes of early settlement, and predicts that peopling of the entire continent occurred rapidly across all ecological environments within 156–208 human generations and at a plausible rate of 0.71–0.92 km year−1.
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