Landscape characteristics influence morphological and genetic differentiation in a widespread raptor (Buteo jamaicensis)

@article{Hull2008LandscapeCI,
  title={Landscape characteristics influence morphological and genetic differentiation in a widespread raptor (Buteo jamaicensis)},
  author={Joshua M Hull and A. C. Jr. Hull and Benjamin N. Sacks and Jeff P. Smith and Holly B. Ernest},
  journal={Molecular Ecology},
  year={2008},
  volume={17}
}
Landscape‐scale population genetic structure in vagile vertebrates was commonly considered to be a contradiction in terms whereas recent studies have demonstrated behaviour and habitat associated structure in several such species. We investigate whether landscape features influence morphological and genetic differentiation in a widespread, mobile raptor. To accurately describe genetic differentiation associated with regional landscape factors, we first investigated subspecies relationships at a… Expand
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