Land-plant ecology on the basis of functional traits.

@article{Westoby2006LandplantEO,
  title={Land-plant ecology on the basis of functional traits.},
  author={Mark Westoby and Ian J. Wright},
  journal={Trends in ecology \& evolution},
  year={2006},
  volume={21 5},
  pages={
          261-8
        }
}
The tissue traits and architectures of plant species are important for land-plant ecology in two ways. First, they control ecosystem processes and define habitat and resources for other taxa; thus, they are a high priority for understanding the ecosystem at a site. Second, knowledge of trait costs and benefits offers the most promising path to understanding how vegetation properties change along physical geography gradients. There exists an informal shortlist of plant traits that are thought to… Expand
Plant functional traits and nutrient gradients on grassland
TLDR
The paper summarizes the power of PFT, the variation along soil nutrient gradients, and gives a case by case conceptual generalization of mechanisms of interacting traits at plant and canopy scale. Expand
Plant Traits and Regeneration
TLDR
This chapter provides a brief description of plant functional traits, plant functional types, seed and seedling ecology, response to changes in ambient CO2, soil water and nutrients and provide a discussion on regeneration of tropical dry-deciduous forest. Expand
From Genes to Ecosystems: Plant Genetics as a Link between Above- and Belowground Processes
TLDR
This chapter addresses several key issues regarding the importance of a “genes to ecosystem” approach in considering plant–soil linkages, including how plant functional traits bridge plant species interactions with soil community dynamics and some of the mechanisms by which plant genetic variation affects ecosystem processes. Expand
Functional trait variation along a hydrological gradient and trait-based predictions of the composition of a wetland plant community
Predicting the assembly of plant communities is considered the Holy Grail of functional ecology and has never been more important as we head into an era of environmental change. Studying plantExpand
Independent Evolution of Leaf and Root Traits within and among Temperate Grassland Plant Communities
TLDR
Results suggest that sorting of pre-existing trait variation into local communities can explain the leaf and root trait diversity in these grasslands. Expand
TRY – a global database of plant traits
TLDR
The improved availability of plant trait data in the unified global database is expected to support a paradigm shift from species to trait-based ecology, offer new opportunities for synthetic plant trait research and enable a more realistic and empirically grounded representation of terrestrial vegetation in Earth system models. Expand
Similarity of plant functional traits and aggregation pattern in a subtropical forest
TLDR
It is found that variation in species distribution at local scale can be explained by soil heterogeneity and plant functional traits. Expand
From pots to plots: hierarchical trait‐based prediction of plant performance in a mesic grassland
TLDR
Root traits were more important for plant performance than leaf traits and were even the most important predictors at the population level and the approach provides a comprehensive framework acknowledging the hierarchical nature of trait influences. Expand
Covariation in Plant Functional Traits and Soil Fertility within Two Species-Rich Forests
TLDR
It is predicted that trait values associated with high resource acquisition and growth rates would be found on soils that are more fertile and less acidic, and that alternative resource axes likely play a larger role in determining the interspecific variability in plant functional traits in the two forests studied. Expand
Importance of whole-plant biomass allocation and reproductive timing to habitat differentiation across the North American sunflowers
TLDR
The results highlight the importance of including data on whole-plant organization alongside organ-level ecophysiological traits when attempting to bridge the gap between functional traits and plant fitness and environmental adaptation. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 87 REFERENCES
Predicting changes in community composition and ecosystem functioning from plant traits: revisiting the Holy Grail
TLDR
A framework using concepts and results from community ecology, ecosystem ecology and evolutionary biology to provide a linkage between traits associated with the response of plants to environmental factors and traits that determine effects of plants on ecosystem functions is presented. Expand
Plant Ecological Strategies: Some Leading Dimensions of Variation Between Species
TLDR
The leaf mass per area–leaf lifespan (LMA-LL) dimension expresses slow turnover of plant parts, long nutrient residence times, and slow response to favorable growth conditions. Expand
The worldwide leaf economics spectrum
TLDR
Reliable quantification of the leaf economics spectrum and its interaction with climate will prove valuable for modelling nutrient fluxes and vegetation boundaries under changing land-use and climate. Expand
The Evolution of Plant Functional Variation: Traits, Spectra, and Strategies
TLDR
Patterns of functional trait variation and trait correlations within and among habitats in relation to several environmental and trade‐off axes are described and whether such patterns reflect natural selection and can be considered plant strategies are asked. Expand
The plant traits that drive ecosystems: Evidence from three continents
TLDR
Whether the screening techniques remain operational in widely contrasted circumstances, to test for the existence of axes of variation in the particular sets of traits, and for their links with ‘harder’ traits of proven importance to ecosystem functioning are discovered. Expand
Challenging Theophrastus: A common core list of plant traits for functional ecology
TLDR
The common core list is suggested as a common starting point for studies of functional ecology, which includes: seed mass, seed shape, dispersal mode, clonality, specific leaf area, leaf water content, height, above-ground biomass, life history, onset of flowering, stem density, and resprouting ability. Expand
Assessing the generality of global leaf trait relationships.
Global-scale quantification of relationships between plant traits gives insight into the evolution of the world's vegetation, and is crucial for parameterizing vegetation-climate models. A databaseExpand
Global organization of terrestrial plant-nutrient interactions.
  • L. Hedin
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
  • 2004
TLDR
Reich and Oleksyn identify two fundamental and geographically broad trends in leaf N and P investment: decreasing leaf P content, and to a lesser degree N content, with decreasing latitude (increasing MAT), and ( ii) increasing leaf N:P ratio with increasing latitude ( increasing MAT). Expand
ENVIRONMENTAL CONSTRAINTS ON A GLOBAL RELATIONSHIP AMONG LEAF AND ROOT TRAITS OF GRASSES
TLDR
Key root and leaf traits of grasses were measured from 77 sites in four grassland regions of the world and there was little relationship between root traits and leaf trait, except for a positive relationship betweenRoot and leaf N concentration and between root and Leaf δ15N. Expand
Differences in seedling growth behaviour among species: trait correlations across species, and trait shifts along nutrient compared to rainfall gradients
TLDR
While SLA and RGR tended to shift together along gradients and in within-habitat PICs, no single attribute emerged as the common, primary factor driving RGR divergences within contrasts, in this important respect the two gradients appeared to be variants of a more general ‘stress’ gradient. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...