Land Clearing and the Biofuel Carbon Debt

@article{Fargione2008LandCA,
  title={Land Clearing and the Biofuel Carbon Debt},
  author={Joseph E. Fargione and Jason D. Hill and David Tilman and Stephen Polasky and Peter L. Hawthorne},
  journal={Science},
  year={2008},
  volume={319},
  pages={1235 - 1238}
}
Increasing energy use, climate change, and carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from fossil fuels make switching to low-carbon fuels a high priority. Biofuels are a potential low-carbon energy source, but whether biofuels offer carbon savings depends on how they are produced. Converting rainforests, peatlands, savannas, or grasslands to produce food crop–based biofuels in Brazil, Southeast Asia, and the United States creates a “biofuel carbon debt” by releasing 17 to 420 times more CO2 than the… Expand
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Use of U.S. Croplands for Biofuels Increases Greenhouse Gases Through Emissions from Land-Use Change
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Direct and indirect effects of possible land-use changes from an expanded global cellulosic bioenergy program on greenhouse gas emissions over the 21st century are examined using linked economic and terrestrial biogeochemistry models. Expand
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Abstract:Comprehensive life cycle assessments show that current transport biofuels often do worse than conventional fossil transport fuels as to the emission of greenhouse gases. Biofuels fromExpand
Forest bioenergy at the cost of carbon sequestration
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