Land, Leadership, and Nation: Haunani-Kay Trask on the Testimonial Uses of Life Writing in Hawai'i

@article{Franklin2004LandLA,
  title={Land, Leadership, and Nation: Haunani-Kay Trask on the Testimonial Uses of Life Writing in Hawai'i},
  author={Cynthia Franklin and Cynthia G Laura E. Lyons},
  journal={Biography},
  year={2004},
  volume={27},
  pages={222 - 249}
}
Haunani-Kay Trask is descended from the Pi‘ilani line of Maui and the Kahakumakaliua line of Kaua‘i. A professor of Hawaiian Studies at the University of Hawai‘i at Mänoa, Trask served as director of the Center for Hawaiian Studies for nearly ten years. During her tenure as director, she played a primary role in the building of the Gladys Brandt Kamakaküokalani Center for Hawaiian Studies. Trask is the author of Eros and Power: The Promise of Feminist Theory (1984). Widely read and taught in… 
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