Lactic Acid and Exercise Performance

@article{Cairns2006LacticAA,
  title={Lactic Acid and Exercise Performance},
  author={S. Cairns},
  journal={Sports Medicine},
  year={2006},
  volume={36},
  pages={279-291}
}
  • S. Cairns
  • Published 2006
  • Medicine
  • Sports Medicine
This article critically discusses whether accumulation of lactic acid, or in reality lactate and/or hydrogen (H+) ions, is a major cause of skeletal muscle fatigue, i.e. decline of muscle force or power output leading to impaired exercise performance. There exists a long history of studies on the effects of increased lactate/H+ concentrations in muscle or plasma on contractile performance of skeletal muscle. Evidence suggesting that lactate/H+ is a culprit has been based on correlation-type… Expand
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