Laboratory environments are not conducive for allopatric speciation

@article{Florin2002LaboratoryEA,
  title={Laboratory environments are not conducive for allopatric speciation},
  author={Ann-Britt Florin and Anders Ödeen},
  journal={Journal of Evolutionary Biology},
  year={2002},
  volume={15}
}
We review published records of laboratory experiments on peripatric and vicariance allopatric speciation to address the following three questions: (1) What was the true effect size of reproductive isolation? (2) Was the reproductive isolation persistent? (3) What influenced the development of isolation? Contrary to popular belief, laboratory evidence for allopatric speciation is quite weak. Assortative mating was only found among derived populations in vicariance experiments. Reproductive… 

Effects of Post-Glacial Range Expansions and Population Bottlenecks on Species Richness

Raw data from mating tests showed that the poor isolation between mother and daughter populations was an effect of asymmetric mate preferences towards males from the mother population, suggesting that peripatric speciation can be effective in generating reproductive isolation between sister populations.

DIVERGENT ENVIRONMENTS AND POPULATION BOTTLENECKS FAIL TO GENERATE PREMATING ISOLATION IN DROSOPHILA PSEUDOOBSCURA

  • H. Rundle
  • Biology
    Evolution; international journal of organic evolution
  • 2003
The novel environment did not cause the evolution of any premating isolation and it reduced the likelihood of speciation through its effects on male mating success, both as a plastic response to this environment and as a result of environment-dependent inbreeding effects in the bottlenecked populations.

Sexual selection and peripatric speciation: the Kaneshiro model revisited

It is shown that bottlenecked males have indeed become less attractive, but females have not lost their ancestral preferences, and the Kaneshiro process may become a strong candidate for speciation in allopatry manifested as isolation between daughter populations in secondary contact.

ADAPTATION TO DESICCATION FAILS TO GENERATE PRE‐ AND POSTMATING ISOLATION IN REPLICATE DROSOPHILA MELANOGASTER LABORATORY POPULATIONS

  • L. KwanH. Rundle
  • Biology
    Evolution; international journal of organic evolution
  • 2010
An evolution experiment in which 12 lines of Drosophila melanogaster were derived from a common population and then independently evolved for more than 57 generations under alternative selection treatments finds that there was no detectable premating isolation between desiccation and starvation populations and postmating isolation was asymmetrical.

PERSPECTIVE: MODELS OF SPECIATION: WHAT HAVE WE LEARNED IN 40 YEARS?

  • S. Gavrilets
  • Biology
    Evolution; international journal of organic evolution
  • 2003
This work describes the Bateson-Dobzhansky-Muller (BDM) model of speciation that does not require overcoming selection and describes exactly how the probability of speciation, the average waiting time to speciation, and the average duration of Speciation depend on the mutation and migration rates, population size, and selection for local adaptation.

Bacteria-induced sexual isolation in Drosophila

It is hypothesize that bacteria-induced sexual isolation is caused by chemosensory cues, and changes in the profile of cuticular hydrocarbons, which function as sex pheromones are altered.

Seafood through time revisited: the Phanerozoic increase in marine trophic resources and its macroevolutionary consequences

This model, an elaboration and extension of the “speciation cycle” previously proposed by Grant and Grant, attempts to explain why an increase in food supply sometimes is associated with decreased diversity, and at other times with increased diversification.

Reconciling evolutionary theory and taxonomic practice

The author claims this alleged disparity between evolutionary theories and taxonomic practices is a misreading, and a proposed modified essentialist species concept involving unique species-specific developmental suites is proposed.

Unintentional genetic processes in artificially maintained populations: Proving the leading role of selection in evolution

Evidence is presented indicating that selection is the leading evolutionary factor that regulates the operation of other factors, directly or through genetic systems.

Measuring coral reef decline through meta-analyses

It is shown how meta-analysis can be used to integrate existing small-scale estimates of change in coral and macroalgal cover, derived from in situ surveys of reefs, to generate a robust assessment of long-term patterns of large-scale ecological change.

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 72 REFERENCES

Effective population size may limit the power of laboratory experiments to demonstrate sympatric and parapatric speciation

This study demonstrates that the experimental evidence frequently used as an argument against sympatric and parapatric speciation models is not as strong as previously believed.

LABORATORY EXPERIMENTS ON SPECIATION: WHAT HAVE WE LEARNED IN 40 YEARS?

The role of geographical separation in generating allopatry has been overemphasized in the past and its role in generating diminished gene flow in combination with strong, discontinuous, and multifarious divergent selection, has been largely unappreciated.

FOUNDER‐FLUSH SPECIATION IN DROSOPHILA PSEUDOOBSCURA: A LARGE‐SCALE EXPERIMENT

The results do not support the claim that the founder‐flush‐crash model identifies conditions very likely to result in speciation events, and it is concluded that although founder events may occasionally lead to the evolution of assortative mating and hence to speciation, the claims are not supported.

Ecology and the origin of species.

Genetic Revolutions, Founder Effects, and Speciation

It is argued that, although founder effects may cause speciation under sufficiently stringent conditions, they are only one extreme of a continuous range of possibilities, and divergence may be driven in a variety of ways, without the need for drastic external changes.

SEXUAL ISOLATION, SPECIATION AND THE DIRECTION OF EVOLUTION

  • K. Kaneshiro
  • Biology
    Evolution; international journal of organic evolution
  • 1980
This paper elaborates the hypothesis proposed by Kaneshiro (1976) and proposes a uni-directional phylogeny for the six populations of the grimshawi complex of species.

Sympatric speciation in animals: the ugly duckling grows up.

  • S. Via
  • Biology
    Trends in ecology & evolution
  • 2001

“PATTERNS OF SPECIATION IN DROSOPHILA” REVISITED

The data from Drosophila are unique-and are likely to remain so-because of the large number of crossable species and the ease of estimating sexual and postzygotic isolation in the laboratory, and some estimates of reproductive isolation and phylogenetic relatedness when better data became available are revised.

Evolution of Reproductive Isolation in Allopatric and Sympatric Populations

Under 5% selective pressure on both sympatric and allopatric populations, both diverged rapidly, with the allop atric populations evolving slightly faster during the 38 generations of the experiment.

SINGLE FOUNDER‐FLUSH EVENTS AND THE EVOLUTION OF REPRODUCTIVE ISOLATION

Results indicate that none of 50 independent founder‐flush lines evolved significant assortative mating relative to the control population, which suggests a diminished emphasis on population bottlenecks in speciation of D. melanogaster and perhaps in general.
...