Laboratory Rearing of Agonopterix alstroemeriana, the Defoliating Poison Hemlock (Conium maculatum L.) Moth, and Effects of Piperidine Alkaloids on Preference and Performance

@inproceedings{Castells2006LaboratoryRO,
  title={Laboratory Rearing of Agonopterix alstroemeriana, the Defoliating Poison Hemlock (Conium maculatum L.) Moth, and Effects of Piperidine Alkaloids on Preference and Performance},
  author={Eva Castells and May R. Berenbaum},
  year={2006}
}
Abstract Conium maculatum L. (Apiaceae), or poison hemlock, is an invasive plant native to Europe that has become extensively naturalized throughout North America. This species contains piperidine alkaloids, including coniine and γ-coniceine, that are highly toxic to vertebrates. C. maculatum was relatively free from herbivores in North America until the accidental introduction 30 yr ago of its monophagous European associate Agonopterix alstroemeriana (Clerck) (Lepidoptera: Oecophoridae). At… Expand
Genetic variation of alkaloid production in Conium maculatum after reassociation with the specialist moth Agonopterix alstroemeriana
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