LTP promotes formation of multiple spine synapses between a single axon terminal and a dendrite

@article{Toni1999LTPPF,
  title={LTP promotes formation of multiple spine synapses between a single axon terminal and a dendrite},
  author={Nicolas Toni and Pierre-Alain Buchs and Irina Nikonenko and C. R. Bron and Dominique Muller},
  journal={Nature},
  year={1999},
  volume={402},
  pages={421-425}
}
Structural remodelling of synapses and formation of new synaptic contacts has been postulated as a possible mechanism underlying the late phase of long-term potentiation (LTP), a form of plasticity which is involved in learning and memory. Here we use electron microscopy to analyse the morphology of synapses activated by high-frequency stimulation and identified by accumulated calcium in dendritic spines. LTP induction resulted in a sequence of morphological changes consisting of a transient… 
LTP Promotes a Selective Long-Term Stabilization and Clustering of Dendritic Spines
TLDR
Using repetitive confocal imaging on hippocampal organotypic cultures, it is found that learning-related patterns of activity that induce long-term potentiation act as a selection mechanism for the stabilization and localization of spines.
Spine changes associated with long‐term potentiation
TLDR
A view is emerging that suggests that morphologic changes of spine synapses are associated with LTP and that they not only correlate with, but probably also contribute to the increase in synaptic transmission.
Functional Plasticity Triggers Formation and Pruning of Dendritic Spines in Cultured Hippocampal Networks
TLDR
Results indicate that long-term functional changes are correlated with morphological modifications of dendritic spines of neurons in a network.
Structural changes at dendritic spine synapses during long-term potentiation.
TLDR
It is shown why dendritic spines do not split during LTP, and both enhanced connectivity and enlarged synapses result duringLTP, with synapse enlargement being the greater effect.
Remodeling of Synaptic Membranes after Induction of Long-Term Potentiation
TLDR
The idea that LTP induction is associated with an enhanced recycling of synaptic membrane and that this process could underlie the formation of synapses with segmented PSDs and eventually result in theformation of a new, immature spine is supported.
Functional and Morphological Plasticity of Dendritic Spines in the Hippocampus
TLDR
It was observed that low-frequency stimulation induced NMDA receptor-dependent spine retractions, while theta-burst stimulation led to the formation of new spines, as reported previously, indicating that spines on CA1 pyramidal neurons from organotypic slice cultures can undergo bidirectional morphological plasticity.
Transient expansion of synaptically connected dendritic spines upon induction of hippocampal long-term potentiation.
TLDR
It is found that induction of long-term potentiation of synaptic transmission in acute hippocampal slices of adult mice evokes a reliable, transient expansion in spines that are synaptically activated, as determined with calcium imaging.
Rapid Ultrastructural Changes of PSD and Extrasynaptic Axon-spine Interface Membrane during LTP Induced in Single Dendritic Spine
TLDR
It is found that the PSD displays rapid (< 3 min) reorganization of its nanostructure, including perforation and segmentation, which likely support the rapid and sustained increase in synaptic transmission during LTP.
' s personal copy Excitatory synaptic activity is associated with a rapid structural plasticity of inhibitory synapses on hippocampal CA 1 pyramidal cells
Synaptic activity, such as long-term potentiation (LTP), has been shown to induce morphological plasticity of excitatory synapses on dendritic spines through the spine head and postsynaptic density
Excitatory synaptic activity is associated with a rapid structural plasticity of inhibitory synapses on hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells
TLDR
Data reveal a rapid activity-related restructuring of somatic inhibitory synapses characterized by an enlargement and increased complexity of inhibitory PSDs, providing a new mechanism for a quick adjustment of the excitatory-inhibitory balance.
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 59 REFERENCES
Induction of long-term potentiation is associated with major ultrastructural changes of activated synapses.
  • P. Buchs, D. Muller
  • Medicine, Biology
    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
  • 1996
TLDR
Results add strong support to the idea that ultrastructural modifications and specifically an increase in perforated synapses are associated with LTP induction in field CA1 of hippocampus and they suggest that a majority of activated contacts may exhibit such changes.
Dendritic spine changes associated with hippocampal long-term synaptic plasticity
TLDR
After induction of long-lasting (but not short-lasting) functional enhancement of synapses in area CA1, new spines appear on the postsynaptic dendrite, whereas in control regions on the same dendrites or in slices where long-term potentiation was blocked, no significant spine growth occurred.
Occurrence and three-dimensional structure of multiple synapses between individual radiatum axons and their target pyramidal cells in hippocampal area CA1
  • K. Sorra, K. Harris
  • Biology, Medicine
    The Journal of neuroscience : the official journal of the Society for Neuroscience
  • 1993
TLDR
Light and serial electron microscopy observations suggest that multiple synapses occur between single axons in stratum radiatum and their target CA1 cells, and that at least some of these synapses may occur at different electronic distances.
Plasticity in the central nervous system: do synapses divide?
  • R. Carlin, P. Siekevitz
  • Medicine, Biology
    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
  • 1983
TLDR
Physiological responses in which synapse division may possibly play a role include hormone-induced neuronal changes, reinnervation of dendrites after lesions, and learning and memory.
Contributions of dendritic spines and perforated synapses to synaptic plasticity
TLDR
The major emphasis of this review is on naturally occurring synaptic plasticity, which is regarded as an ongoing process in the postdevelopmental CNS, with special emphasis on PSs, with their characteristically discontinuous synaptic active zone.
Synapse restructuring associated with the maintenance phase of hippocampal long‐term potentiation
TLDR
A model of structural synaptic plasticity associated with LTP is suggested in which some axospinous perforated synapses increase in numbers shortly after the induction of LTP and are then converted into axodendritic ones during LTP maintenance.
Rapid Actin-Based Plasticity in Dendritic Spines
TLDR
Video recordings from hippocampal neurons expressing actin tagged with GFP-actin revealed large actin-dependent changes in dendritic spine shape, similar to those inferred from previous studies using fixed tissues, suggesting that anatomical plasticity at synapses can be extremely rapid.
Induction of long-term potentiation is associated with an increase in the number of axospinous synapses with segmented postsynaptic densities
TLDR
A major finding of this study is that the induction of LTP is accompanied by a selective increase in the number of synapses with segmented PSDs, and this change was detected only in the potentiated synaptic field (MML), but not in an immediately adjacent one (IML).
Critical assessment of the involvement of perforations, spinules, and spine branching in hippocampal synapse formation
Several studies propose that long‐term enhancement of synaptic transmission between neurons results from the enlargement, perforation, and splitting of synapses and dendritic spines. Unbiased
Evidence for a Role of Dendritic Filopodia in Synaptogenesis and Spine Formation
TLDR
It is suggested that dendritic filopodia may actively initiate synaptogenic contacts with nearby axons and thereafter evolve into dendrite spines.
...
1
2
3
4
5
...