LOWER LIMITS ON APERTURE SIZE FOR AN EXOEARTH DETECTING CORONAGRAPHIC MISSION

@article{Stark2015LOWERLO,
  title={LOWER LIMITS ON APERTURE SIZE FOR AN EXOEARTH DETECTING CORONAGRAPHIC MISSION},
  author={Christopher C. Stark and Aki Roberge and Avi M. Mandell and Mark C. Clampin and Shawn D. Domagal‐Goldman and Michael W. McElwain and Karl R. Stapelfeldt},
  journal={The Astrophysical Journal},
  year={2015},
  volume={808}
}
The yield of Earth-like planets will likely be a primary science metric for future space-based missions that will drive telescope aperture size. Maximizing the exoEarth candidate yield is therefore critical to minimizing the required aperture. Here we describe a method for exoEarth candidate yield maximization that simultaneously optimizes, for the first time, the targets chosen for observation, the number of visits to each target, the delay time between visits, and the exposure time of every… 

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