LIVING FOSSIL MEMORIES

@article{Phillips2008LIVINGFM,
  title={LIVING FOSSIL MEMORIES},
  author={Kathryn Phillips},
  journal={Journal of Experimental Biology},
  year={2008},
  volume={211},
  pages={iii - iii}
}
  • K. Phillips
  • Published 15 June 2008
  • Environmental Science
  • Journal of Experimental Biology
![Figure][1] Nautiloids are the sole surviving family of externally-shelled cephalopods that thrived in the tropical oceans 450–150 million years ago. However, in the intervening years their modern soft bodied relatives dumped the shell and developed complex central nervous systems; which 

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