LITTLE BUILDERS: CORAL INSECTS, MISSIONARY CULTURE, AND THE VICTORIAN CHILD

@article{Elleray2010LITTLEBC,
  title={LITTLE BUILDERS: CORAL INSECTS, MISSIONARY CULTURE, AND THE VICTORIAN CHILD},
  author={Michelle Elleray},
  journal={Victorian Literature and Culture},
  year={2010},
  volume={39},
  pages={223 - 238}
}
  • Michelle Elleray
  • Published 6 December 2010
  • History
  • Victorian Literature and Culture
In his Preface to R. M. Ballantyne's most famous novel, J. M. Barrie writes that “[t]o be born is to be wrecked on an island,” and so the British boy “wonder[s] how other flotsam and jetsam have made the best of it in the same circumstances. He wants a guide: in short, The Coral Island” (v). While for Barrie the island is a convenient shorthand for masculine self-actualization, the question pursued here is the relevance of a coral island, or more specifically the coral that forms the island, to… Expand
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Works Cited
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