LIM-kinase1 Hemizygosity Implicated in Impaired Visuospatial Constructive Cognition

@article{Frangiskakis1996LIMkinase1HI,
  title={LIM-kinase1 Hemizygosity Implicated in Impaired Visuospatial Constructive Cognition},
  author={J. Michael Frangiskakis and Amanda K. Ewart and Colleen A. Morris and Carolyn B. Mervis and Jacquelyn Bertrand and Byron F. Robinson and Bonita P. Klein and Gregory J. Ensing and Lorraine A. Everett and Eric D. Green and Christoph Pr{\"o}schel and Nicholas J. Gutowski and Mark Noble and Donald Atkinson and Shannon J Odelberg and Mark T. Brookline Keating},
  journal={Cell},
  year={1996},
  volume={86},
  pages={59-69}
}

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