Kynurenine pathway inhibition as a therapeutic strategy for neuroprotection

@article{Stone2012KynureninePI,
  title={Kynurenine pathway inhibition as a therapeutic strategy for neuroprotection},
  author={Trevor W. Stone and Caroline M. Forrest and Lynda Gail Darlington},
  journal={The FEBS Journal},
  year={2012},
  volume={279}
}
The oxidative pathway for the metabolism of tryptophan along the kynurenine pathway generates quinolinic acid, an agonist at N‐methyl‐d‐aspartate receptors, as well as kynurenic acid which is an antagonist at glutamate and nicotinic receptors. The pathway has become recognized as a key player in the mechanisms of neuronal damage and neurodegenerative disorders. As a result, manipulation of the pathway, so that the balance between the levels of components of the pathway can be modified, has… 
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TLDR
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