Knowledge, ignorance and the popular culture: climate change versus the ozone hole:

@inproceedings{Ungar2000KnowledgeIA,
  title={Knowledge, ignorance and the popular culture: climate change versus the ozone hole:},
  author={Sheldon B. Ungar},
  year={2000}
}
This paper begins with the “knowledge-ignorance paradox”—the process by which the growth of specialized knowledge results in a simultaneous increase in ignorance. It then outlines the roles of personal and social motivations, institutional decisions, the public culture, and technology in establishing consensual guidelines for ignorance. The upshot is a sociological model of how the “knowledge society” militates against the acquisition of scientific knowledge. Given the assumption of widespread… CONTINUE READING

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