Knowledge, Power, and Racial Classifications: The “Japanese” in “Manchuria”

@article{Tamanoi2000KnowledgePA,
  title={Knowledge, Power, and Racial Classifications: The “Japanese” in “Manchuria”},
  author={M. Tamanoi},
  journal={The Journal of Asian Studies},
  year={2000},
  volume={59},
  pages={248 - 276}
}
  • M. Tamanoi
  • Published 2000
  • History
  • The Journal of Asian Studies
Was knowledge always the basis of colonial power? If so, were colonial rulers invariably confident of the accuracy of their knowledge? Among the Victorian British, for example, there was widespread agreement that India could be known and represented as a series of facts (Cohn 1996, 4). Based on this agreement, the British colonial officials, missionaries, and entrepreneurs tried to demonstrate their power through what Bernard Cohn calls “officializing procedures”: counting, gathering… Expand
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References

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