Knowing When to Ask : The Cost of Leaning-in

@inproceedings{Exley2016KnowingWT,
  title={Knowing When to Ask : The Cost of Leaning-in},
  author={Christine L. Exley and Muriel Niederle and Lise Vesterlund},
  year={2016}
}
Gender differences in the propensity to negotiate are often used to explain the gender wage gap, popularizing the push for women to “lean-in” and negotiate more. In an environment where women who negotiate achieve positive returns, we find that negotiating more is costly: women appear to know when to ask. Relative to women, men enter negotiations more often and experience less financial harm from negotiating more. While both genders positively select into negotiations on observable… CONTINUE READING

References

Publications referenced by this paper.
Showing 1-10 of 49 references

Women at the bargaining table: Pitfalls and prospects.

  • Tinsley, H Catherine, Sandra I. Cheldelin, Andrea Kupfer Schneider, Emily T. Amanatullah
  • Negotiation Journal,
  • 2009
Highly Influential
6 Excerpts

What Works: Gender Equality by Design

  • Bohnet, Iris.
  • Harvard University Press.
  • 2016

Women ask for less (only from men): Evidence from alternating-offer bargaining in the field.

  • Hernandez-Arenaz, Iñigo, Nagore Iriberri
  • Working Paper, University of the Basque Country
  • 2016

A meta-analysis on gender differences in negotiation outcomes and their moderators.

  • Mazei, Jens, +4 authors Guido Hertel
  • Psychological Bulletin,
  • 2015
2 Excerpts

Similar Papers

Loading similar papers…