Knee-deep in the Big Muddy: A study of escalating commitment to a chosen course of action.

@article{Staw1976KneedeepIT,
  title={Knee-deep in the Big Muddy: A study of escalating commitment to a chosen course of action.},
  author={Barry M. Staw},
  journal={Organizational Behavior and Human Performance},
  year={1976},
  volume={16},
  pages={27-44}
}
  • B. M. Staw
  • Published 1 June 1976
  • Psychology
  • Organizational Behavior and Human Performance

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