Kleptomania: Clinical Characteristics and Relationship to Substance Use Disorders

@article{Grant2010KleptomaniaCC,
  title={Kleptomania: Clinical Characteristics and Relationship to Substance Use Disorders},
  author={Jon Edgar Grant and Brian L Odlaug and Suck-Won Kim},
  journal={The American Journal of Drug and Alcohol Abuse},
  year={2010},
  volume={36},
  pages={291 - 295}
}
Background: Although categorized as an impulse control disorder, kleptomania has many features in common with substance use disorders. Objectives: This paper sought to examine the mounting evidence supporting the phenomenological, clinical, epidemiological, and biological links between kleptomania and substance addictions. Methods: A review of the literature examining family history, genetics, comorbid psychiatric conditions, neuroimaging, and phenomenology was utilized to examine the… 
Kleptomania and Co-morbid addictive disorders
A Targeted Review of the Neurobiology and Genetics of Behavioural Addictions: An Emerging Area of Research
  • R. Leeman, M. Potenza
  • Psychology, Medicine
    Canadian journal of psychiatry. Revue canadienne de psychiatrie
  • 2013
TLDR
Findings suggest that compulsive engagement in these behaviours may constitute addictions, particularly for shopping, kleptomania, and sexual behaviour, and genetic understandings are at an early stage, and future research directions are offered.
Symptom severity and its clinical correlates in kleptomania.
  • J. Grant, S. Chamberlain
  • Medicine
    Annals of clinical psychiatry : official journal of the American Academy of Clinical Psychiatrists
  • 2018
TLDR
Feeling a sense of reward from stealing and co-occurrence of certain disorders associated with compulsivity were strongly associated with worse illness severity in kleptomania.
DSM-5 and the Decision Not to Include Sex, Shopping or Stealing as Addictions
For the first time substance use will not be required for the diagnosis of addiction in diagnostic classification manuals, such as DSM and ICD. The DSM-5 has included gambling disorder, along with
Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Kleptomania: A Case Study
Kleptomania is a disabling impulse control disorder, that can be treated with cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT). This was achieved through the results of a case study. The presenting case is
Expanding the definition of addiction: DSM-5 vs. ICD-11
TLDR
This review considers how the issue of “behavioral addictions” has been handled by latest revisions of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) and the International Classification of Diseases (ICD), leading to somewhat divergent approaches.
Opioid antagonists in broadly defined behavioral addictions: a narrative review
TLDR
The review of trials testing the effect of opioid antagonists in gambling disorders and in other broadly defined behavioral addictions found enough evidence to support the use of NTX or NMF in trichotillomania, excoriation (skin-picking) disorder, compulsive buying disorder, hypersexual disorder, or binge eating disorder.
Kleptomania in Patients with Neuro-Behçet's Disease
TLDR
The 6 patients with kleptomania had developed a frontal lobe syndrome and psychiatric assessment did not show any comorbid psychiatric disorders and neuropsychological evaluation showed executive dysfunction in all patients.
Drugs and Recovery: A Qualitative Study in Atlantic Canada
TLDR
A qualitative study of 14 drugs users in a small city in Atlantic Canada exposes their drug-taking experiences and looks at the poignant and distressed lives of the participants during the addiction process and their ongoing struggle to and the treatment, recovery, and possible relapse.
...
1
2
3
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 29 REFERENCES
[Kleptomania: clinical characteristics and treatment].
TLDR
Kleptomania is a disabling disorder that results in intense shame, as well as legal, social, family, and occupational problems and may respond to cognitive behavioral therapy and various pharmacotherapies.
Psychopathology and comorbidity of psychiatric disorders in patients with kleptomania.
TLDR
Kleptomania presented a specific psychopathological profile that distinguished patients with this disorder from patients with alcohol abuse or dependence and other psychiatric comparison patients and could be an appropriate disorder in which to study the information processes and psychobiology underlying impulsivity.
Understanding and treating kleptomania: new models and new treatments.
  • J. Grant
  • Psychology, Medicine
    The Israel journal of psychiatry and related sciences
  • 2006
TLDR
Evidence suggests that there may be subtypes of kleptomania that are more like OCD, whereas others have more similarities to addictive and mood disorders.
The Neurobiology of Substance and Behavioral Addictions
TLDR
Improved understanding of the relationship between behavioral addictions and substance use disorders has important implications not only for further understanding the neurobiology of both categories of disorders but also for improving prevention and treatment strategies.
Family history and psychiatric comorbidity in persons with kleptomania.
  • J. Grant
  • Psychology, Medicine
    Comprehensive psychiatry
  • 2003
Kleptomania: clinical characteristics and associated psychopathology.
TLDR
A review of research on kleptomania suggests it may be a common disorder, especially among women, and that it may frequently be associated with other forms of psychopathology, such as mood, anxiety, and eating disorders.
Clinical characteristics and associated psychopathology of 22 patients with kleptomania.
TLDR
It is concluded that kleptomania is a distressing and disabling disorder associated with high rates of psychiatric comorbidity.
Phenomenologic relationship of eating disorders to major affective disorder
Study of impulse-control disorders among alcohol-dependent patients.
TLDR
Co-occurrence of pathological gambling, however, was associated with lower age at onset of alcohol dependence, a higher number of detoxifications, and a longer duration ofalcohol dependence than was absence of an ICD.
Impulse control disorders in adult psychiatric inpatients.
TLDR
Impulse control disorders appear common among psychiatric inpatients, and patients with and without co-occurring impulse control disorders did not differ significantly from each other on demographic measures or number or type of psychiatric diagnoses other than impulse control disorder.
...
1
2
3
...