Kinks, rings, and rackets in filamentous structures

@article{Cohen2003KinksRA,
  title={Kinks, rings, and rackets in filamentous structures},
  author={Adam E. Cohen and Lakshminarayanan Mahadevan},
  journal={Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America},
  year={2003},
  volume={100},
  pages={12141 - 12146}
}
  • A. Cohen, L. Mahadevan
  • Published 6 October 2003
  • Physics
  • Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Carbon nanotubes and biological filaments each spontaneously assemble into kinked helices, rings, and “tennis racket” shapes due to competition between elastic and interfacial effects. We show that the slender geometry is a more important determinant of the morphology than any molecular details. Our mesoscopic continuum theory is capable of quantifying observations of these structures and is suggestive of their occurrence in other filamentous assemblies as well. 

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