King George III and porphyria: a clinical re-examination of the historical evidence

@article{Peters2010KingGI,
  title={King George III and porphyria: a clinical re-examination of the historical evidence},
  author={T. Peters and D. Wilkinson},
  journal={History of Psychiatry},
  year={2010},
  volume={21},
  pages={19 - 3}
}
The diagnosis that George III suffered from acute porphyria has gained widespread acceptance, but re-examination of the evidence suggests it is unlikely that he had porphyria.The porphyria diagnosis was advanced by Ida Macalpine and Richard Hunter, whose clinical symptomatology and historical methodology were flawed. They highlighted selected symptoms, while ignoring, dismissing or suppressing counter-evidence. Their claims about peripheral neuropathy, cataracts, vocal hoarseness and abdominal… Expand
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King George III suffered from recurrent mania (four episodes), with chronic mania and possibly a degree of fatuity during the last decade of his life, in agreement with previous reports that he suffered from manic-depressive psychosis. Expand
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