Kinesthetic Senses.

@article{Proske2018KinestheticS,
  title={Kinesthetic Senses.},
  author={Uwe Proske and Simon C. Gandevia},
  journal={Comprehensive Physiology},
  year={2018},
  volume={8 3},
  pages={
          1157-1183
        }
}
The kinesthetic senses are the senses of position and movement of the body, senses we are aware of only on introspection. A method used to study kinesthesia is muscle vibration, which engages afferents of muscle spindles to trigger illusions of movement and changed position. When vibrating elbow flexors, it generates sensations of forearm extension, when vibrating extensors, sensations of forearm flexion. Vibrating the elbow joint produces no illusion. Vibrating flexors and extensors together… 
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TLDR
Observations using neuroimaging techniques indicate the involvement of both the cerebellum and parietal cortex in a multi‐sensory comparison, involving operation of a forward model between the feedback during a movement and its expected profile, based on past experience.
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
The results show that the Ia afferent feedback of a given movement evokes the illusion of the same movement when it is applied to the subject via the appropriate pattern of muscle tendon vibration, and suggest that the “proprioceptive signature” of agiven movement is associated with the corresponding “perceptual signature’.
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