Kinematics of foraging dives and lunge-feeding in fin whales

@article{Goldbogen2006KinematicsOF,
  title={Kinematics of foraging dives and lunge-feeding in fin whales},
  author={Jeremy A. Goldbogen and John Calambokidis and Robert E. Shadwick and Erin M. Oleson and Mark A Mcdonald and John A. Hildebrand},
  journal={Journal of Experimental Biology},
  year={2006},
  volume={209},
  pages={1231 - 1244}
}
SUMMARY Fin whales are among the largest predators on earth, yet little is known about their foraging behavior at depth. These whales obtain their prey by lunge-feeding, an extraordinary biomechanical event where large amounts of water and prey are engulfed and filtered. This process entails a high energetic cost that effectively decreases dive duration and increases post-dive recovery time. To examine the body mechanics of fin whales during foraging dives we attached high-resolution digital… 
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