Kinematic Constraints on Glacier Contributions to 21st-Century Sea-Level Rise

@article{Pfeffer2008KinematicCO,
  title={Kinematic Constraints on Glacier Contributions to 21st-Century Sea-Level Rise},
  author={W. Tad Pfeffer and Joel T. Harper and Shad O’Neel},
  journal={Science},
  year={2008},
  volume={321},
  pages={1340 - 1343}
}
On the basis of climate modeling and analogies with past conditions, the potential for multimeter increases in sea level by the end of the 21st century has been proposed. We consider glaciological conditions required for large sea-level rise to occur by 2100 and conclude that increases in excess of 2 meters are physically untenable. We find that a total sea-level rise of about 2 meters by 2100 could occur under physically possible glaciological conditions but only if all variables are quickly… Expand

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