Kindness in the blood: A randomized controlled trial of the gene regulatory impact of prosocial behavior

@article{NelsonCoffey2017KindnessIT,
  title={Kindness in the blood: A randomized controlled trial of the gene regulatory impact of prosocial behavior},
  author={S. Katherine Nelson-Coffey and Megan M. Fritz and Sonja Lyubomirsky and Steve W. Cole},
  journal={Psychoneuroendocrinology},
  year={2017},
  volume={81},
  pages={8-13}
}
CONTEXT Prosocial behavior is linked to longevity, but few studies have experimentally manipulated prosocial behavior to identify the causal mechanisms underlying this association. One possible mediating pathway involves changes in gene expression that may subsequently influence disease development or resistance. DESIGN, SETTING, PARTICIPANTS In the current study, we examined changes in a leukocyte gene expression profile known as the Conserved Transcriptional Response to Adversity (CTRA) in… 
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