Kin associations and direct vs indirect fitness benefits in colonial cooperatively breeding sociable weavers Philetairus socius

@article{Covas2006KinAA,
  title={Kin associations and direct vs indirect fitness benefits in colonial cooperatively breeding sociable weavers Philetairus socius},
  author={Rita Covas and Ambroise Dalecky and Alain Caizergues and Claire Doutrelant},
  journal={Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology},
  year={2006},
  volume={60},
  pages={323-331}
}
Indirect fitness benefits are believed to be an important force behind the evolution of cooperative breeding. However, helpers may associate with their relatives as a result of delayed dispersal, hence, kin associations might be a consequence of demographic viscosity rather than active choice. In addition, recent studies showed that helpers may have access to reproduction therefore direct benefits might also play an important role. Here, we investigate the possible roles of direct genetic… CONTINUE READING

Citations

Publications citing this paper.
Showing 1-10 of 20 extracted citations

Altruism or Just Showing Off ?

Yuko Sakanishi
2007
View 4 Excerpts
Highly Influenced

The evolution of cooperative breeding; is there cheating?

Behavioural processes • 2007
View 4 Excerpts
Highly Influenced

References

Publications referenced by this paper.
Showing 1-10 of 70 references

Life history evolution and cooperative breeding in the sociable weaver

R Covas
2002
View 6 Excerpts
Highly Influenced

Mating systems and sexual conflict. In: Koenig WD, Dickinson JL (eds) Ecology and evolution of cooperative breeding in birds

A Cockburn
2004
View 9 Excerpts
Highly Influenced

Methods of parentage analysis in natural populations.

Molecular ecology • 2003
View 1 Excerpt
Highly Influenced

Evolution of helping behaviour in cooperatively breeding birds

A Cockburn
Ann Rev Ecolog Syst • 1998
View 5 Excerpts
Highly Influenced

GENEPOP (version 1.2): population genetics software for exact tests and ecumenicism

M Raymond, F Rousset
J Hered • 1995
View 1 Excerpt
Highly Influenced

Partitioning of reproduction in animal societies.

Trends in ecology & evolution • 1994
View 4 Excerpts
Highly Influenced

Estimation of genetic relatedness using allozyme data

DC Queller, KF Goodnight
Evolution • 1989
View 1 Excerpt
Highly Influenced

Similar Papers

Loading similar papers…