Kin and Child Survival in Rural Malawi

@article{Sear2008KinAC,
  title={Kin and Child Survival in Rural Malawi},
  author={Rebecca Sear},
  journal={Human Nature},
  year={2008},
  volume={19},
  pages={277-293}
}
  • R. Sear
  • Published 15 July 2008
  • Sociology
  • Human Nature
This paper investigates the impact of kin on child survival in a matrilineal society in Malawi. Women usually live in close proximity to their matrilineal kin in this agricultural community, allowing opportunities for helping behavior between matrilineal relatives. However, there is little evidence that matrilineal kin are beneficial to children. On the contrary, child mortality rates appear to be higher in the presence of maternal grandmothers and maternal aunts. These effects are modified by… 
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