Kin Selection in Primate Groups

@article{Silk2004KinSI,
  title={Kin Selection in Primate Groups},
  author={Joan B. Silk},
  journal={International Journal of Primatology},
  year={2004},
  volume={23},
  pages={849-875}
}
  • J. Silk
  • Published 2004
  • Psychology
  • International Journal of Primatology
Altruism poses a problem for evolutionary biologists because natural selection is not expected to favor behaviors that are beneficial to recipients, but costly to actors. The theory of kin selection, first articulated by Hamilton (1964), provides a solution to the problem. Hamilton's well-known rule (br > c) provides a simple algorithm for the evolution of altruism via kin selection. Because kin recognition is a crucial requirement of kin selection, it is important to know whether and how… Expand
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