Ketorolac in the Treatment of Acute Migraine: A Systematic Review

@article{Taggart2013KetorolacIT,
  title={Ketorolac in the Treatment of Acute Migraine: A Systematic Review},
  author={E. Tom Taggart and S. Doran and Andrea Kokotillo and Sandy Campbell and Cristina Villa‐Roel and Brian H. Rowe},
  journal={Headache: The Journal of Head and Face Pain},
  year={2013},
  volume={53}
}
  • E. Taggart, S. Doran, B. Rowe
  • Published 1 February 2013
  • Medicine, Psychology
  • Headache: The Journal of Head and Face Pain
This systematic review examined the effectiveness of parenteral ketorolac (KET) in acute migraine. Acute migraine headaches are common emergency department presentations, and despite evidence for various treatments, there is conflicting evidence regarding the use of KET. Searches of MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane, CINAHL, and gray literature sources were conducted. Included studies were randomized controlled trials in which KET alone or in combination with abortive therapy was compared with placebo… 
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