Kepler instrument performance: an in-flight update

@inproceedings{Caldwell2010KeplerIP,
  title={Kepler instrument performance: an in-flight update},
  author={Douglas A. Caldwell and Jeffrey E. van Cleve and Jon M. Jenkins and Vic S. Argabright and Jeffery J. Kolodziejczak and Edward Wood Dunham and John Charles Geary and Peter Tenenbaum and Hema Chandrasekaran and Jie Li and Hayley Wu and Jason Von Wilpert},
  booktitle={Astronomical Telescopes + Instrumentation},
  year={2010}
}
The Kepler Mission is designed to detect the 80 parts per million (ppm) signal from an Earth-Sun equivalent transit. Such precision requires superb instrument stability on time scales up to 2 days and systematic error removal to better than 20 ppm. The sole scientific instrument is the Photometer, a 0.95 m aperture Schmidt telescope that feeds the 94.6 million pixel CCD detector array, which contains both Science and Fine Guidance Sensor (FGS) CCDs. Since Kepler's launch in March 2009, we have… 
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References

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The Kepler Mission relies on precise differential photometry to detect the 80 parts per million (ppm) signal from an Earth–Sun equivalent transit. Such precision requires superb instrument stability
Flagging and correction of pattern noise in the Kepler focal plane array
In order for Kepler to achieve its required <20 PPM photometric precision for magnitude 12 and brighter stars, instrument-induced variations in the CCD readout bias pattern (our "2D black image"),
The Kepler Pixel Response Function
Kepler seeks to detect sequences of transits of Earth-size exoplanets orbiting solar-like stars. Such transit signals are on the order of 100 ppm. The high photometric precision demanded by Kepler
Kepler Mission Design, Realized Photometric Performance, and Early Science
The Kepler Mission, launched on 2009 March 6, was designed with the explicit capability to detect Earth-size planets in the habitable zone of solar-like stars using the transit photometry method.
Initial Characteristics of Kepler Long Cadence Data for Detecting Transiting Planets
The Kepler Mission seeks to detect Earth-size planets transiting solar-like stars in its ∼115 deg2 field of view over the course of its 3.5 year primary mission by monitoring the brightness of each
Linearity and High Signal‐to‐Noise Performance of the STIS CCD
On‐orbit data characteristics of the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) CCD aboard the Hubble Space Telescope have been explored with early calibrations in a number of limiting conditions.
Transiting planet search in the Kepler pipeline
The Kepler Mission simultaneously measures the brightness of more than 160,000 stars every 29.4 minutes over a 3.5-year mission to search for transiting planets. Detecting transits is a
Kepler’s Optical Phase Curve of the Exoplanet HAT-P-7b
TLDR
The Kepler mission is performing at the level required to detect Earth-size planets orbiting solar-type stars, including data for the previously known giant transiting exoplanet HAT-P-7b, which shows a smooth rise and fall of light from the planet as it orbits its star, punctuated by a drop when the planet passes behind its star.
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TLDR
The algorithms of the Photometer Performance Assessment software component in the Kepler Science Operations Center (SOC) Science Processing Pipeline are described, which demonstrates the capability to work effectively with the Kepler flight data.
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TLDR
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